Astrologers warn the solar eclipse could seriously impact Trump, USA

Donald Trump’s future, astrologers say, is written in the stars, and they’re predicting Monday’s total solar eclipse will have serious consequences for the 45th president and for the country. Elissa Robinson/DFP
Hikers watched a partial solar eclipse in Phoenix in May 2012. The moon’s silhouette blocked out about 83% of the sun’s surface area in the area. (Photo: Michael Chow, The Arizona Republic)
CONNECT TWEET 5 LINKEDIN COMMENT EMAIL MORE Corrections & Clarifications: A previous version of this story misstated Donald Trump’s Mars sign.

He was born with Mars in Leo.
Donald Trump’s future, astrologers say, is written in the stars, and they predict Monday’s total solar eclipse will have serious consequences for the 45th president and the country.
The movement of stars and planets have an impact on people, according to astrologers. And that has some worried.

“I am genuinely concerned about the future of our country and beyond with all of that is happening in Trump’s astrological chart. He and our nation are at a tipping point with this eclipse,” said Rebecca Gordon, a New York-based astrologer and author who writes for Harper’s Bazaar .

Trump was born on June 14, 1946, during a lunar eclipse. Though his sun sign is in the astrological sign of Gemini, he has Leo rising at 29 degrees on the star Regulus, and Mars is in fiery Leo, said Gordon.

Regulus (the royal star) on his rising and Mars poses a strict royal code of conduct, that if not adhered, can produce ruinous set-backs, she said.
His chart, Gordon said, is filled with “fire and fury” that is essentially being triggered by the degree of this eclipse – the same words he used to describe how America would respond to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un’s escalating threats of nuclear attack.
The eclipse presents a steep challenge for Trump to change course.

Eclipses also tend to usher in sweeping change, especially those like the one we’ll see Monday at 29 degrees of Leo, which aligns precisely with the star Regulus on Trump’s ascendant as well as his Mars.
“This is certainly the most crucial time in his life as this eclipse will peel back the curtains and reveal hidden truths as we have seen already in the months leading up to this eclipse,” Gordon said.
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Kids run into each other inside of inflatable balls during the Eclipse Fest 2017 event held in Weiser, Idaho, on Aug. 20, 2017.

Weiser, Idaho will see 2 minutes and 5 seconds of totality from the solar eclipse on Monday. Kyle Green, Idaho Statesman via AP Fullscreen Jake Flyn helps direct dozens of workers preparing the home of the Georgia Bulldogs, Sanford Stadium, for eclipse viewing and the beginning of NCAA college football season on Aug. 20, 2017, in Athens, Ga. The university, which is in position to view a 99.

1% blackout, will open the gates of Sanford Stadium for a massive viewing party between the hedges.

The first 10,000 guests will receive a free pair of glasses specially designed to view solar eclipses. Curtis Compton, Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP Fullscreen Ray Cooper, volunteer for the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, preps his equipment to provide live video of the solar eclipse at the state fairgrounds in Salem, Ore., on Aug.

20, 2017. Don Ryan, AP Fullscreen Mason Parrone, president of the Southern Illinois University astronomy club, tests his telescope before the solar eclipse on August 20, 2017 in Carbondale, Ill.

With approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality the area in Southern Illinois will experience the longest duration of totality during the eclipse. Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen Children draw pictures of a solar eclipes at a science fair on the campus of Southern Illinois University on Aug. 20, 2017 in Carbondale, Ill. Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen People gather at the Symbiosis Gathering in Ochoco State Forest in Oregon to prepare for the total solar eclipse on Aug. 19, 2017.

The temporary city built in the path of eclipse totality is home for a week to about 30,000 people. Beth Nakamura, The Oregonian via AP Fullscreen Carol Jensen at the Black Bear Diner displays a hat and eclipse glasses Aug. 19, 2017 in Madras, Ore. Stan Honda, AFP/Getty Images Fullscreen James Lyons shows the back of a T-shirt on sale at a roadside stand on Aug.19, 2017 in Madras, Ore.

Stan Honda, AFP/Getty Images Fullscreen A display of Ecliptic Brewery beer is seen in a Safeway grocery store Aug. 19, 2017 in Madras, Ore. Stan Honda, AFP/Getty Images Fullscreen Festival goers practice yoga at the Solar Temple at the Oregon Eclipse Festival, Aug. 19, 2017, at Big Summit Prairie ranch in Oregon’s Ochoco National Forest near the city of Mitchell.

The Solar Temple, which was built for the festival from trees that had been hit by lightening, will be the venue for viewing the total solar eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017. Robyn Beck, AFP/Getty Images Fullscreen Daniel Rossman takes a look at the sun with solar eclipse glasses during the Solar Eclipse Festival at the California Science Center in Los Angeles on Aug. 19, 2017, two days before The Solar Eclipse on Aug.

21.

Frederic J. Brown, AFP/Getty Images Fullscreen A woman views a map showing the route of the sun crossing the United States during the Solar Eclipse Festival at the California Science Center in Los Angeles on Aug. 19, 2017, two days before The Solar Eclipse on Aug. 21. Frederic J.

Brown, AFP/Getty Images Fullscreen With a sign showing full camp grounds, cars drive into Grand Teton National Park on Aug. 19, 2017 outside Jackson, Wyo.

People are flocking to the Jackson and Teton National Park area for the 2017 solar eclipse which will be one of the areas that will experience a 100% eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017. George Frey, Getty Images Fullscreen Cars line up at the south entrance to Grand Teton National Park on Aug. 19, 2017 outside Jackson, Wyo. George Frey, Getty Images Fullscreen A vendor sells solar eclipse stickers on Aug. 19, 2017 in Carbondale, Ill. With approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality the area in Southern Illinois will experience the longest duration of totality during the eclipse. Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen Food concessions on the campus of Southern Illinois University are nearly deserted two days before Monday’s solar eclipse on Aug.

19, 2017 in Carbondale, Ill. Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen A sign directs visitors to parking areas to view the solar eclipse on Aug. 19, 2017 in Carbondale, Ill. Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen People visit Bald Knob Cross for Peace on Aug. 19, 2017 near Alto Pass, Ill. Organizers expect more than 700 guests to view to view the solar eclipse from the base of the cross. Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen Jim Blair walks Saluki dogs past a solar eclipse exhibit on the campus of Southern Illinois University on Aug. 19, 2017 in Carbondale, Ill.

Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen A sign advertises parking spots for the Solar eclipse on Aug. 19, 2017 in Makanda, Ill. Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen Suzanne Rapley of Santa Barbara, Calif., takes a photo at sunset with her iPhone on Aug. 18, 2017, she is one of many total solar eclipse enthusiasts gathering in Madras, Ore. and staying in organized campgrounds.

Rob Kerr, AFP/Getty Images Fullscreen Total solar eclipse enthusiasts gather in Madras, Ore. on Aug.

18, 2017, the rural central and eastern part of Oregon is hosting dozens of festivals to help manage the crowds to the region for the Aug. 21, 2017, natural phenomena. Rob Kerr, AFP/Getty Images Fullscreen Poureal Long, a fourth grader at Clardy Elementary School in Kansas City, Mo., practices the proper use of eclipse glasses on Aug.

18, 2017, in anticipation of the solar eclipse. Charlie Riedel, AP Fullscreen Shoppers pick out solar eclipse t-shirts at the Idaho Falls farmers market Aug. 19, 2017. The sleepy town of Idaho Falls, Id. has a population of 60,000 but public officials are bracing for up to 500,000 visitors for the eclipse. John Roark, The Idaho Post-Register via AP Fullscreen Cars line up at the south entrance to Grand Teton National Park on Aug.

19, 2017, outside Jackson, Wy. People are flocking to the Jackson and Teton National Park area for the 2017 solar eclipse which will be one of the areas that will experience a 100% eclipse.

George Frey, Getty Images Fullscreen Solar Tech Joshua Valdez, left, and Senior Plant Manager Tim Wisdom walk past solar panels at a Pacific Gas and Electric Solar Plant on Aug. 17, 2017, in Vacaville, Calif. Power grid managers say they’ve been preparing extensively for more than a year for this Monday’s solar eclipse and that by ramping up other sources of power, mainly hydroelectric and natural gas, they are confident nobody will lose power or see a spike in energy prices. Rich Pedroncelli, AP` Fullscreen Smoke from wildfires darkens the sky as visitors set up camp at ‘SolarTown’ in Madras, Ore.

on Aug. 17, 2017, to see the total solar eclipse on August 21. The western US state of Oregon, which has only four million residents, is expecting as many as one million eclipse visitors over the next four days. Robyn Beck, AFP/Getty Images Fullscreen This aerial photo provided by the Oregon State Police shows a 15-mile traffic jam on Highway 26 heading in to Prineville, Ore.

on Aug. 17, 2017. Traffic is already a headache in central Oregon as thousands of people are arriving before Monday’s total solar eclipse. Oregon State Police via AP Fullscreen An eclipse glasses sold out sign is posted outside the Clark Planetarium main doors advising people to safely view the eclipse with a pinhole projector after the planetarium ran out of glasses on Aug.

17, 2017, in Salt Lake City. Brady McCombs, AP Fullscreen In this photo provided by Clemson University, Donald and Norma Liebenberg stand in the driveway of their home in Salem, S.C., on Aug. 17, 2017. Donald has seen and blogged about his 26 eclipses for Clemson University where he does research, and holds the record for most time in totality because the retired federal scientist used to chase them by airplane whenever possible. But in 2017, the celestial event will come to him. Ken Scar, Clemson University via AP Fullscreen Colton Hammer tries out new eclipse glasses he bought from the Clark Planetarium in Salt Lake City, Utah in preparation for the eclipse on Aug.

16, 2017. Scott G Winterton, The Deseret News via AP Fullscreen The front page of the Metropolis Planet features a story about the solar eclipse on Aug. 17, 2017, in Metropolis, Ill. Metropolis is located along the eclipse path of totality in Southern Illinois. Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen A sign outside of Fort Massac State Park urges people to view the solar eclipse from the park on Aug. 17, 2017 in Metropolis, Ill. The park is located along the eclipse path of totality in Southern Illinois.

Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen Carrie Trochim, 34, on left, and colleague, Kirsten Polley, 26, test out eclipse glasses on the University of Colorado’s Boulder campus on Aug.

15, 2017. They were among the last customers to snap up glasses from the bookstore before it ran out of its stock of 10,000 pairs. Trevor Hughes, USA TODAY Fullscreen Robin Scott joins other volunteers to help prepare for Solquest on Aug. 17, 2017, in Cerulean, Ky. Located on 75 acres in rural Western Kentucky, Solquest is a three-day religious festival located near the point of greatest totality for the Aug.

21 eclipse.

Organizers are preparing for as many as 15,000 people to attend the free festival which will run through the total eclipse on Aug. 21.

Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen David Morgan works with other volunteers to help prepare for Solquest on Aug. 17, 2017, in Cerulean, Ky. Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen Eclipse glasses are displayed for sale on Aug. 14, 2017 at a Roth’s Markets grocery store in Salem, Ore.

Anna Reed, Statesman Journal via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen Oregon Gov. Kate Brown speaks in Salem, Ore., on Aug.

15, 2017, about the coming eclipse that will cross Oregon on Aug. 21, 2017. The state is bracing for as many as 1 million visitors to the state, which will be the first to experience the eclipse as it travels across the USA. Don Ryan, AP Fullscreen Griffin Moore makes solar eclipse related shirts at her Griffin’s Studio on Aug. 16, 2017, in Hopkinsville, Ky.

Hopkinsville is in western Kentucky and located near the point of greatest totality for the Aug. 21 eclipse. The eclipse 70 miles wide across the United States from Salem, Ore., to Charleston, S.

C.

Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen Arlon ‘A.J.

‘ Casey Jones and his wife Peg Hays, owners of the Casey Jones Distillery, hold bottles of Total Eclipse Moonshine, which they distilled with the still behind them to commemorate the upcoming solar eclipse on Aug. 16, 2017, in Hopkinsville, Ky. The distillery, which is located two miles from the point of greatest totality for the Aug. 21 eclipse, expects to host as many as 3,500 people who plan to view the eclipse from their grounds just outside of Hopkinsville. Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen An eclipse countdown clock sits among a display of Total Eclipse Moonshine.

Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen Agnes Busch, 90, the former owner of the 1976 GMC recreational vehicle that was converted into the Mobile Earth & Space Observatory, watches as people tour the mobile observatory outside the MESO office in Colorado Springs, Colo., on Aug.

15, 2017. A team from the Pikes Peak Observatory will drive it to Nebraska to participate in the Citizen CATE project that will document the solar eclipse.

Christian Murdock, The Gazette via AP Fullscreen Dave Dardis, owner of the Rainmaker art studio in Makanda, Ill., talks about the ‘Solar Eclipse Pendants’ he created on July 19, 2017. Makanda will get two minutes, 40.2 seconds of darkness during the total solar eclipse on Aug.

21, more than anywhere else in the United States.

The center point of the eclipse will pass directly through Dardis’ shop and he has pointed a bright orange strip on the ground and up walls of his business to attract the public to his shop. David Carson, St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP Fullscreen Riley Martin stands on a desk holding a cell phone with a light on it to mimic the sun as Lindsey Davis, left, Rebecca McPherson, right, and Preston Davis, demonstrate how they plan to observe the coming solar eclipse in Spencer, Ind.

, on Aug. 11, 2017. Students have made models of the solar system to demonstrate what happens during an eclipse, putting a miniature moon between a tiny Earth and model sun. Chris Howell, The Herald-Times via AP Fullscreen Astronomer Forrest Hamilton shows off one of the telescopes that he will take with him when he travels to see the total solar eclipse in Walton, Ind.

The telescope includes a spot to place an iPhone to record video of the eclipse. Kevin Burkett, The Pharos-Tribune via AP Fullscreen A worker at Ace Hardware fans out eclipse glasses for sale at the store in Spring City, Tenn.

, on Aug. 11, 2017.

Thousands are expected to flock to the small Rhea County town, which is home to about 2000 residents, to view the solar eclipse. Doug Strickland, Chattanooga Times Free Press via AP Fullscreen Ilaeka Villa, who owns the nearby Grandview Mountain Cottages and Glamor Camping venue, leaves Hassler’s Drugs in Spring City, Tenn.

, on Aug. 11, 2017.

Villa said that the cottages on their property were fully booked more than a year and a half ago for the upcoming solar eclipse. Doug Strickland, Chattanooga Times Free Press via AP Fullscreen From left, Kenyon Kilby, Doyle Daniels, Jason Yuhas and Nathan Reed, with Spring City Public Works, install additional power outlets in the Spring City Nature Park in preparation for the upcoming eclipse, in Spring City, Tenn., on Aug. 11, 2017. Doug Strickland, Chattanooga Times Free Press via AP Fullscreen Amateur astronomer Mike Conley practices with the telescope he will use to document the Aug. 21 total solar eclipse at his home in Salem, Ore.

Conley is part of a project led by the National Solar Observatory to have dozens of citizen-scientists posted across the USA photograph the celestial event in an effort to create a live movie of its path that will help scientists learn more about the sun’s corona. Gillian Flaccus, AP Fullscreen An 8-foot balloon carrying a camera rises into the sky during a test launch at the University of Hartford in West Hartford, Conn., on Aug.

9, 2017. A team from the University of Bridgeport and the University of Hartford conducted the test as part a project that will send cameras into the stratosphere to photograph the solar eclipse. Pat Eaton-Robb, AP Fullscreen An advertisement for a central Oregon festival built around the Aug.

21 total solar eclipse sits alongside a busy road leading into Madras, Ore., on June 13, 2017, Gillian Flaccus, AP Fullscreen Like this topic? You may also like these photo galleries: Replay 1 of 51 2 of 51 3 of 51 4 of 51 5 of 51 6 of 51 7 of 51 8 of 51 9 of 51 10 of 51 11 of 51 12 of 51 13 of 51 14 of 51 15 of 51 16 of 51 17 of 51 18 of 51 19 of 51 20 of 51 21 of 51 22 of 51 23 of 51 24 of 51 25 of 51 26 of 51 27 of 51 28 of 51 29 of 51 30 of 51 31 of 51 32 of 51 33 of 51 34 of 51 35 of 51 36 of 51 37 of 51 38 of 51 39 of 51 40 of 51 41 of 51 42 of 51 43 of 51 44 of 51 45 of 51 46 of 51 47 of 51 48 of 51 49 of 51 50 of 51 51 of 51 Autoplay Show Thumbnails Show Captions Last Slide Next Slide
“For Trump,” Gordon said, “this eclipse falls on his Mars, the planet which rules expressions of anger and power. Hence, we see the demeanor he has when speaking about North Korea, and overall sense of animosity and rage. Trump and Kim happen to have their planet Mars in direct opposition to each other, therefore, the eclipse falls on Trump’s Mars and opposes Kim’s Mars, and so conflicts can escalate fast in this dangerous duo (as we see they have already.

)”
Shelley Ackerman, a New York-based astrologer, says this eclipse cycle harkens back to the total solar eclipse of February 1979. Shortly before, the Ayatollah Khomeini seized power in Iran. A few weeks later, the Three Mile Island nuclear disaster occurred in Pennsylvania.
“Eclipses have historically coincided with the birth and death of monarchs, the beginnings and ends of particular eras, and of course, it hits Donald Trump’s chart in a big way. And we’re seeing that now. Look at him.

You know, he’s under fire.”
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And it’s been 99 years since a total solar eclipse’s path of totality has spanned the entire continental United States as this one will.
“This is the first one since 1918 that has crossed the country in this way,” she said. “If you think about what was going on at this time in 1918, the Spanish Flu was raging, Word War I was at its height.
It wasn’t all bad, though.

“That was when the standardization of time became the norm,” Ackerman said.

“The whole time thing was a very big event. The time zones were put together.”
She pointed to last weekend’s civil unrest in Charlottesville, Va., and said that’s evidence of the power of the coming eclipse already at work.
“We’re seeing the eclipse already,” she said. “Look at this, our country is torn apart.

The ‘alt-right’ saying, ‘Oh the left is OK with people of color outnumbering the rest of us,’ ” she said, referencing the far-right group whose ideology supports racism, populism and white nationalism.
Astrologer Samuel F. Reynolds of New York also sees civil unrest related to race and power playing heavily into this eclipse.
Monday marks the 186th anniversary of the nation’s largest and longest slave rebellion. On Aug. 21, 1831 day, Nathaniel (Nat) Turner led the insurrection in Southampton County, Va. About 50 white people were killed.

Retaliation for the uprising was fierce and long-lasting. Turner was hanged, as were many of the other slaves who rebelled, and a wave of harsh new laws were enacted that prohibited slaves from being taught to read and write. It effectively killed a budding Virginian abolitionist movement, too.
The rebellion came just two weeks after an Aug. 7 total solar eclipse and two days before an Aug. 23 lunar eclipse.
“His revolt forever changed the dynamics of what was happening with enslavement.

It led to more controls, and slave patrols to capture runaways,” he said.
As for Trump, Reynolds said, “I think he’s going to experience a lot more heat, literally, I am not one of the astrologers who believes this all bodes ill for him. But it may bode ill for us.”
Kristy Robinett, a Michigan-based psychic/medium who uses energy readings to inform her astrological predictions, said she’s not convinced war is looming.
“Astrological energy seems to suggest more conflict and more violence, and that things will be shaken up” she said. “But are we going to war? I don’t think so. I think we’re going to see more civil unrest, though.


Because Mercury is in retrograde during this eclipse, Robinett said some of the biggest effects of this astrological event might be more muted.

“If it wasn’t in retrograde, I’d be a little more worried, honestly,” she said. “I think this retrograde kind of takes the edge off the eclipse, and softens it a bit.”
Contact Detroit Free Press Staff Writer Kristen Jordan Shamus at kshamus@freepress.

com. Follow her on Twitter @kristenshamus.
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..in 1918 | 1:35 There hasn’t been a total solar eclipse visible from coast to coast since June of 1918. Here’s a comparison of then and now of what the U.S. was like. USA TODAY
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26 of 27 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 Want Solar Eclipse 2017? Win a chance to see it on Alaska Airlines | 1:41 On August 21, the United States will experience a truly rare celestial phenomenon: A total solar eclipse. Time
27 of 27 Last Video Next Video This DIY ‘moon’ ice will make your solar eclipse party even better Flashback to the last total solar eclipse.

..in 1918 Solar eclipse could be tricky for drivers Vanderbilt University recalls 8,000 eclipse viewing glasses There’s only one real danger during a total solar eclipse The solar eclipse could cost employers a ton of money Oregon man warns: Protect your eyes during eclipse 3 nonscientific reasons everyone is ‘geeking out’ over the eclipse Eclipse glasses shortages being reported More than spectacle: Eclipses create science Neil deGrasse Tyson: Put down phone during eclipse What you need to know about this summer’s solar eclipse All those eclipse apps Don’t fall for knockoff solar eclipse glasses Solar Eclipse 2017 explained Krispy Kreme is going dark for this month’s total solar eclipse See what happens during a total solar eclipse Eye protection critical for solar eclipse viewing Here’s how NASA will study the sun during the total solar eclipse Here’s how you can watch the eclipse with Sasquatch A ‘ring of fire’ will appear in the sky during rare eclipse Upcoming solar eclipse to be live-streamed from thousands of feet up Scientists are asking for your help in creating an ‘eclipse megamovie’ New solar eclipse stamp does something no other stamp can This tiny town is the best place to catch the total solar eclipse Anticipation grows in path of solar eclipse Want Solar Eclipse 2017? Win a chance to see it on Alaska Airlines.