Solar eclipse 2017: Scientists to study data for years to come

People all over North America were treated to a stunning view of the eclipse. The total solar eclipse is one of nature’s most rare and awe inspiring sights. The path stretched from Newport, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. USA TODAY
The sun’s corona was visible during the total solar eclipse of Aug., 21, 2017. (Photo: NASA)
45 COMMENT EMAIL MORE The Great American Eclipse is over, and we can all forget about it and get on with our lives, right?
Not so fast. The scientists who studied the eclipse will continue to pore over the data gathered and publish scientific studies for years.
During the eclipse, one of the most important observations was of the sun’s corona, the sun’s thin, outer atmosphere that’s only visible during total eclipses.

The corona is so dim that it’s usually totally overwhelmed by the light from the sun, Space.com said, but during the total solar eclipse, that light was conveniently blocked.

That allowed astronomers to study the shape, structure and extent of the sun’s corona. Of particular interest is the magnetic field of the sun’s corona, which can help improve predictions of when the sun might erupt with a solar flare or coronal mass ejection, which can affect telecommunications systems here on Earth.

“Total solar eclipses mostly tell us about the structure of the solar corona and its influence on the solar wind and on the interplanetary magnetic field,” said Edward Rhodes of the University of Southern California.
Orbiting satellites also captured reams of data during the eclipse, NASA said.
In addition, NASA’s Eclipse Ballooning Project Students conducted high-altitude balloon flights from 30 locations across the total eclipse path, sending live video and images from near space NASA about the Earth’s weather and other information.
WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 Eclipse in the USA: then and now | 1:02 The last eclipse in the USA was February 26, 1979.

What’s changed in the USA from then to now? The differences from 1979 to now are staggering in categories like GDP, average salary, gas price, and even most popular song. Video provided by TheStreet Newslook
1 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 Spectators watch total eclipse in Oregon | 0:48 Crowds gathered in Salem, Oregon to watch as a total solar eclipse made landfall on the United States. (Aug. 21) AP
2 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 Eclipse watchers stake out spots | 0:47 Americans staked out viewing spots from Oregon to South Carolina to watch the moon blot out the midday sun for a magical couple of minutes Monday in what promised to be the most observed and photographed eclipse in history.

(Aug. 21) AP
3 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 Eclipse begins over Madras, Oregon | 0:54 In what promises to be the most observed and photographed eclipse in history, the start of a total solar eclipse can now be seen from Oregon. (Aug. 21) AP
4 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 Football coaches don’t care about the eclipse | 1:19 SportsPulse: While the world prepares for the solar eclipse, these football coaches are keeping their minds on the field.

USA TODAY Sports
5 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 Comics on the meaning behind today’s eclipse in Best of Late Night | 2:25 Why is the eclipse like a Trump news conference? Find out in today’s Best of Late Night. USA TODAY Opinion_Eileen Rivers
6 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 The first place to see the solar eclipse | 1:06 The Yaquina Head lighthouse is the first place to see the Total Solar Eclipse in the continental United States. Jefferson Graham takes a tour. Video by Anna Reed
7 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 Flashback to the last total solar eclipse…in 1918 | 1:35 There hasn’t been a total solar eclipse visible from coast to coast since June of 1918. Here’s a comparison of then and now of what the U.S. was like.

USA TODAY
8 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 Oregon man warns: Protect your eyes during eclipse | 1:44 Lou Tomososki burned his retina while looking at a partial eclipse at 1962 and now hopes to warn others of the dangers. USA TODAY
9 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 Vanderbilt University recalls 8,000 eclipse viewing glasses | 0:40 Vanderbilt University recalled 8000 pair of eclipse viewing glasses. Elizabeth Keatinge (@elizkeatinge) has more. Buzz60
10 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 Solar eclipse could be tricky for drivers | 1:08 The Federal Highway Administration is calling the event ​one of the largest driver distractions in years.

Video provided by Newsy Newslook
11 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 There’s only one real danger during a total solar eclipse | 1:35 A total solar eclipse is a natural event. For the most part, it’s no more dangerous than any other day. Video provided by Newsy Newslook
12 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 Man about to witness his 27th total solar eclipse | 2:54 Astronomer Donald Liebenberg has spent more time in totality — when the moon covers the sun — than any other person on Earth. Video provided by Newsy Newslook
13 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 The solar eclipse could cost employers a ton of money | 1:09 The total solar eclipse will be on Monday August 21, and it could cost employers millions in lost productivity. Time
14 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 This DIY ‘moon’ ice will make your solar eclipse party even better | 0:55 All you need are some tennis balls, water balloons, and a couple key ingredients to add color. Reviewed.

com – Jeremy Stamas and Jackson Ruckar
15 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 3 nonscientific reasons everyone is ‘geeking out’ over the eclipse | 5:33 Phil Plait, aka the ‘Bad Astronomer,’ chatted with Newsy about the upcoming total solar eclipse and why he thinks there’s so much hype. Video provided by Newsy Newslook
16 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 Eclipse glasses shortages being reported | 0:15 Stores across the country are reporting shortages of eclipse glasses Trevor Hughes/USA TODAY
17 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 More than spectacle: Eclipses create science | 2:55 Next week’s stunning solar eclipse in the United States will generate as much science as oohs and aahs. Citizen-scientists will have a chance to participate by watching animals and launching high-altitude balloons and scientific telescopes. (Aug. 14) AP
18 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 Neil deGrasse Tyson: Put down phone during eclipse | 1:09 Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson is urging people to put down their smart phones during next Monday’s solar eclipse and experience it in the moment: emotionally, physically and psychologically. (Aug.

14) AP
19 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 What you need to know about this summer’s solar eclipse | 1:39 On Aug. 21, a total solar eclipse will be visible to mainland America. Find out why it is drawing giddy excitement from the public, as well as astronomy gurus. USA TODAY NETWORK
20 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 All those eclipse apps | 1:20 Jefferson Graham’s guide to all those apps to enjoy the August 21 solar eclipse on #TalkingTech.

21 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 Don’t fall for knockoff solar eclipse glasses | 0:59 If you’re hoping to catch a glimpse of August 21’s solar eclipse, buyers beware. Buzz60
22 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 Solar Eclipse 2017 explained | 1:33 On Aug. 21 we will see the first solar eclipse in the U.S.

since 1979. Our graphic explains exactly what one is, shows its path and some how-to viewing tips. By Ramon Padilla Karl Gelles, Dann Miller, Walbert Castillo, Janet Loehrke and Sara Wise, USA TODAY NETWORK
23 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 Krispy Kreme is going dark for this month’s total solar eclipse | 0:49 Krispy Kreme is ditching their original glaze for the first time. Angeli Kakade (@angelikakade) has the story. Buzz60
24 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 See what happens during a total solar eclipse | 1:44 On August 21, there will be a total solar eclipse crossing from coast-to-coast in the U.S. It is expected to be the most viewed eclipse in history. Want to know what to expect? Check out this animation.

(Aug. 4) AP
25 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 Eye protection critical for solar eclipse viewing | 2:36 Can you really damage your eyes while staring at the sun? How to safely view the upcoming solar eclipse.

(Aug. 10) AP
26 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 Here’s how NASA will study the sun during the total solar eclipse | 1:07 A total solar eclipse is happening on August 21st and the people at NASA are taking full advantage of the situation to learn more about the sun.

Ryan Sartor (@ryansartor) has that story. Buzz60
27 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 Here’s how you can watch the eclipse with Sasquatch | 1:00 Get ready to watch the eclipse with Sasquatch! Nathan Rousseau Smith (@fantasticmrnate) explains. Buzz60
28 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 A ‘ring of fire’ will appear in the sky during rare eclipse | 0:42 People in South America and Southern Africa will have a front row seat to a rare eclipse on Sunday. Josh King has the story (@abridgetoland).

Buzz60
29 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 Upcoming solar eclipse to be live-streamed from thousands of feet up | 1:05 A total solar eclipse is coming on August 21, and even if you’re not astronomically blessed enough to be in its path, you won’t be left in the dark. Buzz60’s Amanda Kabbabe (@kabbaber) has more. Buzz60
30 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 Scientists are asking for your help in creating an ‘eclipse megamovie’ | 0:59 Filmmakers are being asked to help film the next solar eclipse in what is being called the Eclipse Megamovie Project. Josh King has the story @abridgetoland). Buzz60
31 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 New solar eclipse stamp does something no other stamp can | 1:06 Even the United States Postal Service is gearing up for the rare solar eclipse craze with a stamp that changes when you touch it. Sean Dowling (@seandowlingtv) has more. Buzz60
32 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 This tiny town is the best place to catch the total solar eclipse | 0:53 For the first time in 99 years, a solar eclipse will be visible in the United States. A small town in Illinois is the best place to see it.

Aidan Kelley has the story. Buzz60
33 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 Anticipation grows in path of solar eclipse | 2:17 Hopkinsville, Kentucky, a city of about 32,000 people will have one of the longest durations of the solar eclipse on August 21. Tens of thousands of people are expected to watch the eclipse from this rural area. (June 28) AP
34 of 35 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 Want Solar Eclipse 2017? Win a chance to see it on Alaska Airlines | 1:41 On August 21, the United States will experience a truly rare celestial phenomenon: A total solar eclipse.

Time
35 of 35 Last Video Next Video Eclipse in the USA: then and now Spectators watch total eclipse in Oregon Eclipse watchers stake out spots Eclipse begins over Madras, Oregon Football coaches don’t care about the eclipse Comics on the meaning behind today’s eclipse in Best of Late Night The first place to see the solar eclipse Flashback to the last total solar eclipse…in 1918 Oregon man warns: Protect your eyes during eclipse Vanderbilt University recalls 8,000 eclipse viewing glasses Solar eclipse could be tricky for drivers There’s only one real danger during a total solar eclipse Man about to witness his 27th total solar eclipse The solar eclipse could cost employers a ton of money This DIY ‘moon’ ice will make your solar eclipse party even better 3 nonscientific reasons everyone is ‘geeking out’ over the eclipse Eclipse glasses shortages being reported More than spectacle: Eclipses create science Neil deGrasse Tyson: Put down phone during eclipse What you need to know about this summer’s solar eclipse All those eclipse apps Don’t fall for knockoff solar eclipse glasses Solar Eclipse 2017 explained Krispy Kreme is going dark for this month’s total solar eclipse See what happens during a total solar eclipse Eye protection critical for solar eclipse viewing Here’s how NASA will study the sun during the total solar eclipse Here’s how you can watch the eclipse with Sasquatch A ‘ring of fire’ will appear in the sky during rare eclipse Upcoming solar eclipse to be live-streamed from thousands of feet up Scientists are asking for your help in creating an ‘eclipse megamovie’ New solar eclipse stamp does something no other stamp can This tiny town is the best place to catch the total solar eclipse Anticipation grows in path of solar eclipse Want Solar Eclipse 2017? Win a chance to see it on Alaska Airlines Atmospheric scientists closely monitored changes in temperature and other weather changes. In Tennessee, for example, the temperature dropped as much as 7 degrees in Crossville, the National Weather Service reported.
Scientists at zoos and aquariums across the country also closely watched animal behavior during the eclipse, which will be studied in the months ahead.

At the Memphis Zoo, for instance, though not in the path of totality, animals such as elephants, hippos, crocodiles and penguins exhibited unusual behavior.
“We saw some subtle changes to Asali’s behavior,” said Amanda Schweighart, the elephant manager, referring to an elephant at the zoo. “She’s the youngest of our herd, and she went into an ‘alert’ stance, that lasted several seconds.

Once she reunited herself with her two herd mates, her behavior returned to normal.”
Young giraffes at the Nashville zoo were also spotted running in circles during the eclipse.
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The diamond ring appears as the moon starts to move away from totality during the total solar eclipse in Murfreesboro, Tenn. Helen Comer, Daily News Journal via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen A composite of seven images from stages of the total solar eclipse in Hopkinsville, Ky. The moon is traveling from left to right in the image. Michael Clevenger, Courier Jouranal via USA TODAY N Fullscreen Nancy Kuliesis, left, and daughter Ginny Kuliesis, 9, sit in the shadow of the cross at the Jefferson Cross Memorial Park in Wickliffe, Ky during the eclipse.

Alton Strupp, Courier-Journal-USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen The solar eclipse seen from St. Joseph, Mo.

Rodney White, The Register via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen The moon eclipses the sun for a total solar eclipse over Carhenge in Alliance, Neb. Zach Boyden-Holmes, Des Moines Register via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen Maricruz Arteagaholds up cardboard with holes to project the eclipse on the sidewalk so people can see the eclipse at California Institute of Technology in of Pasadena, Calif.

Robert Hanashiro, USA TODAY Fullscreen Tavon Boaman, Bella Demitanda, and Connor Christensen, all of Ft. Collins, Colo arrange crystals into a pattern at Carhenge before the total solar eclipse in Alliance, Neb. Zach Boyden-Holmes, Des Moines Register via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen A view of the eclipse from the Jefferson Memorial Cross Park in Wickliffe, Ky.

Alton Strupp, Courier Journal via USA TODAY NETWOR Fullscreen People gather to watch the Solar Eclipse in Washington D.C. Jack Gruber, USA TODAY Fullscreen Spectators photograph totality from the roof of their RVs in Solartown, a solar eclipse campground in Madras, Ore.

Molly J. Smith, Statesman Journal via USA TODAY NETW Fullscreen Rick Brazelton of Bardwell, Ky. uses a welders helmet to view the eclipse at the Jefferson Cross Memorial Park in Wickliffe, Ky. Alton Strupp, Courier Journal-USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen The solar eclipse as seen from Nashville, Tenn.

on Aug. 21, 2017. Andrew Nelles, The Tennessean via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen Melissa Cheatwood, from Baltimore, Md., gazes up as the eclipse enters totality in Charleston, S.C. on Aug. 21, 2017. Henry Taylor, USA TODAY Fullscreen In this multiple exposure photograph, the phases of a partial solar eclipse are seen over the Gateway Arch on Aug.

21, 2017, in St. Louis. The Gateway Arch was just a few miles outside of the path of totality. Jeff Roberson, AP Fullscreen People view the eclipse as it approaches totality at Centennial Park in Nashville, Tenn.

on Aug. 21, 2017. Alan Poizner for The Tennessean via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen President Trump and first lady Melania Trump wear protective glasses as they view the solar eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017, at the White House.

Andrew Harnik, AP Fullscreen President Trump points skyward before donning protective glasses to view the solar eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017, at the White House. Andrew Harnik, AP Fullscreen The moon eclipses the sun near the Washington Monument in Washington, DC on Aug. 21 2017.

Eighty one percent of the sun was obscured in DC.

Jim Lo Scalzo, European Pressphoto Agency Fullscreen Mierka Willis of Washington, DC wears a cardboard box made into a camera obscura to watch the peak of the partial Solar Eclipse from the base of the Washington Monument/ Jack Gruber, USA TODAY Fullscreen Spectators photograph totality from the roof of their RVs in Solartown, a solar eclipse campground, on Aug. 21, 2017, just north of Madras, Ore. MOLLY J.

SMITH / Statesman Journal via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen Photographer David Sternberg of Vermont looks at his take of the solar eclipse at Rosecrans Air National Guard Base in St. Joseph, Mo. Rodney White, The Des Moines Register Fullscreen Spectators view the total solar eclipse during totality in Isle of Palms, S.C., on Aug. 21, 2017. Jasper Colt, USA TODAY Fullscreen Malon Taylor, 7, takes a look up at the sun alongside mother LaDondra Taylor during a solar eclipse watch party hosted by the Science Center of Iowa outside the Iowa State Capitol in Des Moines. Michael Zamora, The Des Moines Register via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen A partial solar eclipse is seen near the Statue of Liberty on Liberty Island in New York on Aug.

21, 2017. Seth Wenig, AP Fullscreen Students watch the totality of the solar ellipse in Hopkinsville, KY. Matt Stone, Courier-Journal via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen A sliver of the post-solar eclipse sun peeks from behind rain clouds on Aug.

21, 2017, at Rosecrans Air National Guard Base in Saint Joseph, Mo. Rodney White, The Des Moines Register via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen From left, siblings Adriana, 4, and Anthony Morocco, 7, look up at the eclipse with Christopher Forrester, 6, on the beach at Isle of Palms in Charleston, S.C.

, Aug. 21, 2017.

Angela Wilhelm, Asheville Citizen-Times via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen Spectators view the total solar eclipse in Isle of Palms, S.C.

, on Aug. 21, 2017.

Jasper Colt, USA TODAY Fullscreen The solar eclipse in totality over Falls Park Bridge in Greenville, S.C.. Lauren Petracca, The Greenville News-USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen Kindergarten teacher Nancy Morgan reads books about the sun and moon to her students at St. Andrew’s as rain falls at the start of the solar eclipse on Aug.

21, 2017, in Savannah, Ga. The students wear the Sun masks they made in class.

Steve Bisson, Savannah Morning News via AP Fullscreen The total solar eclipse darkens the sky over Carhenge in Alliance, Neb. on Aug. 21, 2017 Zach Boyden-Holmes, Des Moines Register via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen Megan Shrewsbury and Kim Galyen, both firefighters from Alliance dress as aliens to celebrate the solar eclipse at Carhenge in Alliance, Neb. Zach Boyden-Holmes, Des Moines Register via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen Lori Peek tries to snap a selfie while looking through her eclipse glasses at the Jefferson Cross Memorial Park in Wickliffe, KY. Alton Strupp, Courier-Journal via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen Spectators watching the eclipse in downtown Sweetwater, Tenn. Michael Patrick, News Sentinel via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen People watch the solar eclipse at Saluki Stadium on the campus of Southern Illinois University on Aug.

21, 2017 in Carbondale, Ill. Although much of it was covered by a cloud, with approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality the area in Southern Illinois experienced the longest duration of totality during the eclipse.

Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen The sky goes dark as the eclipse reaches totality at Isle of Palms in Charleston, S.C. Aug. 21, 2017. (Via OlyDrop) Angela Wilhelm, /awilhelm@citizen-times.

com Fullscreen People in Times Square try to takes photos and view the solar eclipse in New York.

Don Emmert, AFP/Getty Images Fullscreen A view of the solar eclipse through a pair of protective filters at the Cincinnati Observatory in Cincinnati, Ohio. Sam Greene Fullscreen The 2017 solar eclipse as seen above Churchill Downs during peak coverage in Louisville, KY. Sam Upshaw Jr., Courier-Journal via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen Mary Joe Humphrey watches as the solar eclipse takes place near a cornfield in Hopkinsville, KY. Matt Stone, Courier-Journal via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen People gather on Aug. 21, 2017 at the Tom McCall Waterfront Park in Portland to catch a glimpse of the 2017 total solar eclipse. Sarah Silbiger, The Oregonian via AP Fullscreen A view of the 2017 eclipse from the Jefferson Memorial Cross Park in Wickliffe, KY. Alton Strupp, Courier-Journal via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen Ninety-year-old Jeannette Raines looks skyward with her eclipse solar glasses as watchers gathered at The Chapel of Sky Valley for today’s total solar eclipse as seen from within the path of totality in Sky Valley, Ga.

John David Mercer via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen Vice President Mike Pence, with students from Cornerstone Schools, watches the solar eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017, at the U.

S. Naval Observatory in Washington. Manuel Balce Ceneta, AP Fullscreen Raleigh Hogan-Miller of Washington, DC looks up from the base of the Washington Monument while watching the partial Solar Eclipse. Jack Gruber, USA TODAY Fullscreen The first total solar eclipse to cross the entire continental United States in 99 years ended it’s voyage in Charleston, S.C. where thousands of vacationers stationed themselves at viewing parties and open locations to view the once in a lifetime event on Aug.

21, 2017. Henry Taylor, USA TODAY Fullscreen Barb Lamb, of Hamburg, wears a colander hat as a joke, to keep the aliens from reading her mind, during the eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017, at the Lower Hamburg Bend Wildlife Management Area in the far south west corner of Iowa, the only part of the state to be in the path of the total eclipse. Kelsey Kremer, The Des Moines Register via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen The crowd at the Nashville eclipse-viewing party watches the start of the eclipse at First Tennessee Park.

Shelley Mays, The Tennessean via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen HILTON HEAD ISLAND, SC – AUGUST 21: Mark and Molly Moser, from Denver, Colo., watch the first solar eclipse to sweep across the United States in over 99 years in the Atlantic Ocean on Aug. 21, 2017 on Hilton Head Island, S.C. Win McNamee, Getty Images Fullscreen Mary Beth Davis, of Evansville, Ind., wears a sun hat as she views the solar eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017, on the Orchard Dale historical farm near Hopkinsville, Ky.

The location, which is in the path of totality, is also at the point of greatest intensity. Mark Humphrey, AP Fullscreen The eclipse is framed by the Musica statue on Music Row in Nashville, TN. Lacy Atkins, The Tennessean via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen A woman views the solar eclipse at ‘Top of the Rock’ observatory at Rockefeller Center, Aug. 21, 2017 in New York. Drew Angerer, Getty Images Fullscreen A total solar eclipse is seen above the Bald Knob Cross of Peace on Aug. 21, 2017, in Alto Pass, Ill. More than 700 people visited the over 100 foot cross for the event.

Charles Rex Arbogast, AP Fullscreen Plastic pink flamingos wear solar eclipse viewing glasses at the camping site of Grady and Margaret Beasley, of Crystal Beach, Texas on Aug. 21, 2017, on the Orchard Dale historical farm near Hopkinsville, Ky. The location, which is in the path of totality, is also at the point of greatest intensity. Mark Humphrey, AP Fullscreen Projected images of the eclipse are seen through the leaves on the trees on the sidewalk at the White House in Washington. Alex Brandon, AP Fullscreen Josh Mims, 9, watches as the moon passes in front of the sun during a partial solar eclipse on Aug.

21, 2017, in Milwaukee. Morry Gash, AP Fullscreen People look at the solar eclipse at the National Mall in Washington on Aug. 21, 2017. Michael Reynolds, European Pressphoto Agency Fullscreen A solar eclipse passes over Marys Peak on the Siuslaw National Forest in Oregon. Connor Radnovich, Statesman Journal via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen Shirley Liu, of Portland, Ore.

watches the Great American total solar eclipse travel over the Yaquina Bay Bridge in Newport, Ore. on Aug. 21, 2017. Anna Reed, Statesman Journal via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen The Great American total solar eclipse travels over the Yaquina Bay Bridge in Newport, Ore.

on Aug 21, 2017. Anna Reed, Statesman Journal via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen A solar eclipse passes over Marys Peak on the Siuslaw National Forest in Oregon on Aug. 21, 2017. Connor Radnovich, Statesman Journal via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen A crowd gathers in front of the Hollywood sign at the Griffith Observatory to watch the solar eclipse in Los Angeles on Aug. 21, 2017. Richard Vogel, AP Fullscreen The sun in partial eclipse is shown through the Ghost Ballet statue along the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tenn. George Walker IV, The Tennessean via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen Val Carney, of Asheville, N.

C., sculpts “total eclipse of the sand” into the sand at Isle of Palms in Charleston, South Carolina as she waits for the eclipse August 21, 2017. Angela Wilhelm, Citizen-Times via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen People watch the start of the solar eclipse and raise their hands in prayer in an eclipse viewing event led by Native American elders, at Big Summit Prairie ranch in Oregon’s Ochoco National Forest near the city of Mitchell on Aug.21, 2017. Robyn Beck, AFP/Getty Images Fullscreen Grace Goodrich, of Duarte, Calif. uses two pieces of paper to project the eclipse so she can watch it. ‘They ran out of the glasses,’ she said.

Despite only a 60 percent partial eclipse a large crowd gathered to watch the Great American Solar Eclipse at California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, Calif on Aug. 21.

Astronomers and volunteers were on hand to answer questions about the eclipse, and astronomy. Robert Hanashiro, USA TODAY Fullscreen Annie Gray Penuel, 9, and Lauren Peck, 14, both of Dallas, Tex., have their makeshift eclipse glasses on at Nashville’s eclipse viewing party at First Tennessee Park. Shelley Mays, The Tennessean via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen Madison wears sunglasses to view the eclipse along the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tenn. George Walker IV, The Tennessean via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen A crowd wears protective glasses as they watch the beginning of the solar eclipse from Salem, Ore.

on Aug.

21, 2017. Don Ryan, AP Fullscreen This NASA handout photo shows the Moon seen as it starts passing in front of the Sun during a solar eclipse from Ross Lake, Northern Cascades National Park, Wash.

on Aug. 21, 2017. Bill Ingalls/NASA via AFP/Getty Images Fullscreen Leroy Littlejohn of Cherokee, N.C., has his photo taken while waiting for a total solar eclipse in Great Smoky Mountains National Park at Clingmans Dome, Tenn. on Aug. 21, 2017. Caitie Mcmekin, Knoxville News Sentinel via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen Nashville Sounds’ mascot, Booster, sports eclipse glasses at the city’s viewing party at First Tennessee Park, the Minor League Baseball team’s stadium, on Aug.

21, 2017 in Nashville, Tenn.. Shelley Mays, The Tennessee via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen Sheila Stevens and her daughter, Elizabeth, both of Sanford, N.C., get their photo taken by Gwen Mathews, of Fletcher, N.C. on the beach in Isle of Palms in Charleston, S.C., before the solar eclipse Aug.

21, 2017. Angela Wilhelm, Citizen-Times via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen Molly Vaughn takes a selfie with her mother, Diane Vaughn, both of Nashvillie, at the city’s eclipse viewing party at First Tennessee Park on Aug. 21, 2017. Shelley Mays, The Tennessean via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen Julian Leftwich, 11, and brother Gabriel, 6, watch the eclipse at Nashville’s eclipse-viewing party at First Tennessee Park on Aug. 21, 2017 in Nashville, Tenn. Shelley Mays, The Tennessean via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen Bryan Mayhood of the Nashville Sounds hands out eclipse glasses at the city’s viewing party at First Tennessee Park. Shelley Mays, The Tennessean via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen The sun rises behind the Solar Temple at Big Summit Prairie ranch in Oregon’s Ochoco National Forest near the city of Mitchell ahead of the total solar eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017.

Robyn Beck, AFP/Getty Images Fullscreen Virginia Webb arrives to watch the solar eclipse at the Rabun Gap-Nacoochee School in Rabun Gap, Ga on Aug. 21, 2017. Erik S. Lesser, European Pressphoto Agency Fullscreen David Austin peers through a telescope at the observatory at Land Between the Lakes on Aug.

21. Austin, from Wayne, NJ, said he has been waiting for the solar eclipse since July 20, 1963, when he was 12 and saw a partial escalope in St. Louis. Mark Hicks, The Leaf-Chronicle via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen Mexican players put on solar eclipse glasses for a television spot, just before a Little League World Series game against Asia-Pacific in Volunteer Stadium in South Williamsport, Pa.

on Aug. 21, 2017.

Mark Pynes, PennLive.com via AP Fullscreen A view of the sun as seen from Nashville, Tenn., prior to the solar eclipse on Aug.

21, 2017. Andrew Nelles, The Tennessean via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen Brian Marriott of Boston, Mass.

looks in a storage container on top of his car before watching the solar eclipse at South Mike Sedar Park on Aug. 21, 2017 in Casper, Wyo. Millions of people have flocked to areas of the U.

S. that are in the ‘path of totality’ in order to experience a total solar eclipse. During the event, the moon will pass in between the sun and the Earth, appearing to block the sun. Justin Sullivan, Getty Images Fullscreen Bob Gottlieb of Missouri Valley, Iowa, sports a distinctive shirt as he chats with others in downtown Falls City, Neb., on Aug.

21, 2017, as people gather to watch a total solar eclipse to sweep the U.

S. coast to coast. Nati Harnik, AP Fullscreen Jason Arbaugh, of Austin, lines up his shot for the solar eclipse at the Gateway Arch on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, in St. Louis.

The Gateway Arch sits a few miles outside of the path of totality. Jeff Roberson, AP Fullscreen Teenie Tim sits on his perch on Josh Paul’s shoulders at Isle of Palms in Charleston, S.C., Aug.

21, 2017. The pair traveled from Raleigh, N.C., to watch the eclipse. Paul says Tim wears his sunglasses regardless of whether there is a solar eclipse.

Angela Wilhelm, Asheville Citizen-Times via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen Chas Mathis from Morristown, Tenn., uses binoculars with special solar filters to watch the sunrise as he waits in Veteran’s Park for the total solar eclipse on Aug.

21, 2017, in Spring City, Tenn. Doug Strickland, Chattanooga Times Free Press via AP Fullscreen A sign stands at the Orchard Dale historical farm near Hopkinsville, Ky., Aug. 21, 2017.

The location, which is in the path of totality of the solar eclipse, is also at the point of greatest intensity. Mark Humphrey, AP Fullscreen Beatrice resident David Knisely, with the Prairie Astronomy Club, sets his telescope to track the moon in preparation for the afternoon’s total solar eclipse at the Heritage Center on Aug. 21, 2017, at Homestead National Monument of America in Beatrice, Neb. Gwyneth Roberts, The Journal-Star via AP Fullscreen Bradley Music, left, and Joseph Bowersox, both of West Virginia, claim a spot on the Isle of Palms beach in Charleston, S.

C., Aug. 21, 2017. They arrived at 4 am after traveling 11 hours to see the eclipse.

‘I picked this spot because it is the very last spot on the coast before the eclipse falls into the ocean,’ said Music. Angela Wilhelm, Asheville Citizen-Times via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen Capt. Brian Holm, a 737 flight captain for Alaska Airlines who will be on the flight deck of a special eclipse charter flight, points to a map that shows the plane’s path on Aug. 21, 2017, in Portland, Ore.

Passengers on the flight will witness totality from over the Pacific Ocean.

Rachel La Corte, AP Fullscreen Katie Vega and her dog Toby wait for the solar eclipse in Weiser, Idaho, Aug. 21, 2017. Katie and her husband Vincent traveled from Sacramento.

Otto Kitsinger, AP Fullscreen Spectators gather in downtown Sweetwater, Tenn. for the Eclipse 2017 festivities on Aug. 21, 2017. Michael Patrick, News Sentinel via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen Griffin O’Roak watches the rising sun with his homemade eclipse viewer at a gathering of eclipse viewers in Salem, Ore.

on Aug. 21, 2017. Don Ryan, AP Fullscreen Schweta Kulkarni, from left, Rhea Kulkarni and Saanvi Kulkarni, from Seattle, try out their eclipse glasses on the sun at a gathering of eclipse viewers in Salem, Ore., early Aug.

21, 2017. Don Ryan, AP Fullscreen Joe Roth, left, and Scott Foster from the Chicago area are silhouetted as they prepare telescopes and cameras to observe a total solar eclipse at the base of the Bald Knob Cross of Peace on Aug.

21, 2017, in Alto Pass, Ill.

Charles Rex Arbogast, AP Fullscreen Mark Renz, of Rochester, N.

Y., sets up his Sunspotter, a device for viewing the solar eclipse, at his campsite Aug. 21, 2017, on the Orchard Dale historical farm near Hopkinsville, Ky. The location, which is in the path of totality, is also at the point of greatest intensity.

Mark Humphrey, AP Fullscreen Jim Cleveland, of Shelbyville, Ky., sets up a camera at his campsite at sunrise as he prepares for the solar eclipse Aug. 21, 2017, on the Orchard Dale historical farm near Hopkinsville, Ky. Mark Humphrey, AP Fullscreen The decorated car of Frank and Mary Ludwig, of La Crescent, Minn.

, sits at their campsite at the Orchard Dale historical farm near Hopkinsville, Ky. Aug.

21, 2017. Mark Humphrey, AP Fullscreen Allen Winzler of Cincinnati, gives solar eclipse viewing glasses to his daughters Mallory, 6, and Makayla, 3, as they prepare at their campsite for the solar eclipse Aug. 21, 2017, on the Orchard Dale historical farm near Hopkinsville, Ky. The location, which is in the path of totality, is also at the point of greatest intensity. Mark Humphrey, AP Fullscreen A visitor puts a pin on map to show where she is visiting from during the Wyoming Eclipse Festival on Aug. 20, 2017 in Casper, Wyo.

Thouands of people have descended on Casper to see the solar eclipse in the path of totality as it passes over the state on Aug. 21. Justin Sullivan, Getty Images Fullscreen Kids run into each other inside of inflatable balls during the Eclipse Fest 2017 event held in Weiser, Idaho, on Aug. 20, 2017.

Weiser, Idaho will see 2 minutes and 5 seconds of totality from the solar eclipse on Monday.

Kyle Green, Idaho Statesman via AP Fullscreen Jake Flyn helps direct dozens of workers preparing the home of the Georgia Bulldogs, Sanford Stadium, for eclipse viewing and the beginning of NCAA college football season on Aug. 20, 2017, in Athens, Ga. The university, which is in position to view a 99.1% blackout, will open the gates of Sanford Stadium for a massive viewing party between the hedges. The first 10,000 guests will receive a free pair of glasses specially designed to view solar eclipses.

Curtis Compton, Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP Fullscreen Ray Cooper, volunteer for the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, preps his equipment to provide live video of the solar eclipse at the state fairgrounds in Salem, Ore., on Aug. 20, 2017. Don Ryan, AP Fullscreen Mason Parrone, president of the Southern Illinois University astronomy club, tests his telescope before the solar eclipse on August 20, 2017 in Carbondale, Ill. With approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality the area in Southern Illinois will experience the longest duration of totality during the eclipse. Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen Children draw pictures of a solar eclipes at a science fair on the campus of Southern Illinois University on Aug.

20, 2017 in Carbondale, Ill. Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen People gather at the Symbiosis Gathering in Ochoco State Forest in Oregon to prepare for the total solar eclipse on Aug.

19, 2017. The temporary city built in the path of eclipse totality is home for a week to about 30,000 people.

Beth Nakamura, The Oregonian via AP Fullscreen Carol Jensen at the Black Bear Diner displays a hat and eclipse glasses Aug. 19, 2017 in Madras, Ore. Stan Honda, AFP/Getty Images Fullscreen James Lyons shows the back of a T-shirt on sale at a roadside stand on Aug.19, 2017 in Madras, Ore. Stan Honda, AFP/Getty Images Fullscreen A display of Ecliptic Brewery beer is seen in a Safeway grocery store Aug.

19, 2017 in Madras, Ore. Stan Honda, AFP/Getty Images Fullscreen Festival goers practice yoga at the Solar Temple at the Oregon Eclipse Festival, Aug. 19, 2017, at Big Summit Prairie ranch in Oregon’s Ochoco National Forest near the city of Mitchell. The Solar Temple, which was built for the festival from trees that had been hit by lightening, will be the venue for viewing the total solar eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017. Robyn Beck, AFP/Getty Images Fullscreen Daniel Rossman takes a look at the sun with solar eclipse glasses during the Solar Eclipse Festival at the California Science Center in Los Angeles on Aug. 19, 2017, two days before The Solar Eclipse on Aug.

21. Frederic J. Brown, AFP/Getty Images Fullscreen A woman views a map showing the route of the sun crossing the United States during the Solar Eclipse Festival at the California Science Center in Los Angeles on Aug. 19, 2017, two days before The Solar Eclipse on Aug. 21. Frederic J. Brown, AFP/Getty Images Fullscreen With a sign showing full camp grounds, cars drive into Grand Teton National Park on Aug. 19, 2017 outside Jackson, Wyo.

People are flocking to the Jackson and Teton National Park area for the 2017 solar eclipse which will be one of the areas that will experience a 100% eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017. George Frey, Getty Images Fullscreen Cars line up at the south entrance to Grand Teton National Park on Aug. 19, 2017 outside Jackson, Wyo. George Frey, Getty Images Fullscreen A vendor sells solar eclipse stickers on Aug. 19, 2017 in Carbondale, Ill.

With approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality the area in Southern Illinois will experience the longest duration of totality during the eclipse. Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen Food concessions on the campus of Southern Illinois University are nearly deserted two days before Monday’s solar eclipse on Aug.

19, 2017 in Carbondale, Ill. Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen A sign directs visitors to parking areas to view the solar eclipse on Aug. 19, 2017 in Carbondale, Ill. Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen People visit Bald Knob Cross for Peace on Aug. 19, 2017 near Alto Pass, Ill.

Organizers expect more than 700 guests to view to view the solar eclipse from the base of the cross.

Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen Jim Blair walks Saluki dogs past a solar eclipse exhibit on the campus of Southern Illinois University on Aug.

19, 2017 in Carbondale, Ill.

Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen A sign advertises parking spots for the Solar eclipse on Aug. 19, 2017 in Makanda, Ill. Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen Suzanne Rapley of Santa Barbara, Calif., takes a photo at sunset with her iPhone on Aug.

18, 2017, she is one of many total solar eclipse enthusiasts gathering in Madras, Ore. and staying in organized campgrounds. Rob Kerr, AFP/Getty Images Fullscreen Total solar eclipse enthusiasts gather in Madras, Ore. on Aug. 18, 2017, the rural central and eastern part of Oregon is hosting dozens of festivals to help manage the crowds to the region for the Aug.

21, 2017, natural phenomena. Rob Kerr, AFP/Getty Images Fullscreen Poureal Long, a fourth grader at Clardy Elementary School in Kansas City, Mo., practices the proper use of eclipse glasses on Aug.

18, 2017, in anticipation of the solar eclipse. Charlie Riedel, AP Fullscreen Shoppers pick out solar eclipse t-shirts at the Idaho Falls farmers market Aug. 19, 2017. The sleepy town of Idaho Falls, Id.

has a population of 60,000 but public officials are bracing for up to 500,000 visitors for the eclipse. John Roark, The Idaho Post-Register via AP Fullscreen Cars line up at the south entrance to Grand Teton National Park on Aug.19, 2017, outside Jackson, Wy. People are flocking to the Jackson and Teton National Park area for the 2017 solar eclipse which will be one of the areas that will experience a 100% eclipse. George Frey, Getty Images Fullscreen Solar Tech Joshua Valdez, left, and Senior Plant Manager Tim Wisdom walk past solar panels at a Pacific Gas and Electric Solar Plant on Aug. 17, 2017, in Vacaville, Calif.

Power grid managers say they’ve been preparing extensively for more than a year for this Monday’s solar eclipse and that by ramping up other sources of power, mainly hydroelectric and natural gas, they are confident nobody will lose power or see a spike in energy prices. Rich Pedroncelli, AP` Fullscreen Smoke from wildfires darkens the sky as visitors set up camp at ‘SolarTown’ in Madras, Ore.

on Aug. 17, 2017, to see the total solar eclipse on August 21. The western US state of Oregon, which has only four million residents, is expecting as many as one million eclipse visitors over the next four days. Robyn Beck, AFP/Getty Images Fullscreen This aerial photo provided by the Oregon State Police shows a 15-mile traffic jam on Highway 26 heading in to Prineville, Ore.

on Aug. 17, 2017. Traffic is already a headache in central Oregon as thousands of people are arriving before Monday’s total solar eclipse. Oregon State Police via AP Fullscreen An eclipse glasses sold out sign is posted outside the Clark Planetarium main doors advising people to safely view the eclipse with a pinhole projector after the planetarium ran out of glasses on Aug.

17, 2017, in Salt Lake City. Brady McCombs, AP Fullscreen In this photo provided by Clemson University, Donald and Norma Liebenberg stand in the driveway of their home in Salem, S.C., on Aug. 17, 2017. Donald has seen and blogged about his 26 eclipses for Clemson University where he does research, and holds the record for most time in totality because the retired federal scientist used to chase them by airplane whenever possible. But in 2017, the celestial event will come to him. Ken Scar, Clemson University via AP Fullscreen Colton Hammer tries out new eclipse glasses he bought from the Clark Planetarium in Salt Lake City, Utah in preparation for the eclipse on Aug.

16, 2017. Scott G Winterton, The Deseret News via AP Fullscreen The front page of the Metropolis Planet features a story about the solar eclipse on Aug. 17, 2017, in Metropolis, Ill. Metropolis is located along the eclipse path of totality in Southern Illinois. Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen A sign outside of Fort Massac State Park urges people to view the solar eclipse from the park on Aug. 17, 2017 in Metropolis, Ill.

The park is located along the eclipse path of totality in Southern Illinois. Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen Carrie Trochim, 34, on left, and colleague, Kirsten Polley, 26, test out eclipse glasses on the University of Colorado’s Boulder campus on Aug.

15, 2017. They were among the last customers to snap up glasses from the bookstore before it ran out of its stock of 10,000 pairs. Trevor Hughes, USA TODAY Fullscreen Robin Scott joins other volunteers to help prepare for Solquest on Aug. 17, 2017, in Cerulean, Ky. Located on 75 acres in rural Western Kentucky, Solquest is a three-day religious festival located near the point of greatest totality for the Aug.

21 eclipse. Organizers are preparing for as many as 15,000 people to attend the free festival which will run through the total eclipse on Aug. 21.

Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen David Morgan works with other volunteers to help prepare for Solquest on Aug. 17, 2017, in Cerulean, Ky. Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen Eclipse glasses are displayed for sale on Aug. 14, 2017 at a Roth’s Markets grocery store in Salem, Ore. Anna Reed, Statesman Journal via USA TODAY NETWORK Fullscreen Oregon Gov. Kate Brown speaks in Salem, Ore., on Aug. 15, 2017, about the coming eclipse that will cross Oregon on Aug.

21, 2017. The state is bracing for as many as 1 million visitors to the state, which will be the first to experience the eclipse as it travels across the USA. Don Ryan, AP Fullscreen Griffin Moore makes solar eclipse related shirts at her Griffin’s Studio on Aug. 16, 2017, in Hopkinsville, Ky. Hopkinsville is in western Kentucky and located near the point of greatest totality for the Aug.

21 eclipse. The eclipse will cut a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Salem, Ore., to Charleston, S.C. Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen Arlon ‘A.

J.’ Casey Jones and his wife Peg Hays, owners of the Casey Jones Distillery, hold bottles of Total Eclipse Moonshine, which they distilled with the still behind them to commemorate the upcoming solar eclipse on Aug. 16, 2017, in Hopkinsville, Ky. The distillery, which is located two miles from the point of greatest totality for the Aug. 21 eclipse, expects to host as many as 3,500 people who plan to view the eclipse from their grounds just outside of Hopkinsville. Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen An eclipse countdown clock sits among a display of Total Eclipse Moonshine.

Scott Olson, Getty Images Fullscreen Agnes Busch, 90, the former owner of the 1976 GMC recreational vehicle that was converted into the Mobile Earth & Space Observatory, watches as people tour the mobile observatory outside the MESO office in Colorado Springs, Colo.

, on Aug. 15, 2017. A team from the Pikes Peak Observatory will drive it to Nebraska to participate in the Citizen CATE project that will document the solar eclipse. Christian Murdock, The Gazette via AP Fullscreen Dave Dardis, owner of the Rainmaker art studio in Makanda, Ill., talks about the ‘Solar Eclipse Pendants’ he created on July 19, 2017. Makanda will get two minutes, 40.2 seconds of darkness during the total solar eclipse on Aug.

21, more than anywhere else in the United States. The center point of the eclipse will pass directly through Dardis’ shop and he has pointed a bright orange strip on the ground and up walls of his business to attract the public to his shop. David Carson, St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP Fullscreen Riley Martin stands on a desk holding a cell phone with a light on it to mimic the sun as Lindsey Davis, left, Rebecca McPherson, right, and Preston Davis, demonstrate how they plan to observe the coming solar eclipse in Spencer, Ind., on Aug. 11, 2017. Students have made models of the solar system to demonstrate what happens during an eclipse, putting a miniature moon between a tiny Earth and model sun.

Chris Howell, The Herald-Times via AP Fullscreen Astronomer Forrest Hamilton shows off one of the telescopes that he will take with him when he travels to see the total solar eclipse in Walton, Ind.

The telescope includes a spot to place an iPhone to record video of the eclipse. Kevin Burkett, The Pharos-Tribune via AP Fullscreen A worker at Ace Hardware fans out eclipse glasses for sale at the store in Spring City, Tenn., on Aug. 11, 2017. Thousands are expected to flock to the small Rhea County town, which is home to about 2000 residents, to view the solar eclipse. Doug Strickland, Chattanooga Times Free Press via AP Fullscreen Ilaeka Villa, who owns the nearby Grandview Mountain Cottages and Glamor Camping venue, leaves Hassler’s Drugs in Spring City, Tenn., on Aug. 11, 2017.

Villa said that the cottages on their property were fully booked more than a year and a half ago for the upcoming solar eclipse. Doug Strickland, Chattanooga Times Free Press via AP Fullscreen From left, Kenyon Kilby, Doyle Daniels, Jason Yuhas and Nathan Reed, with Spring City Public Works, install additional power outlets in the Spring City Nature Park in preparation for the upcoming eclipse, in Spring City, Tenn., on Aug. 11, 2017.

Doug Strickland, Chattanooga Times Free Press via AP Fullscreen Amateur astronomer Mike Conley practices with the telescope he will use to document the Aug. 21 total solar eclipse at his home in Salem, Ore. Conley is part of a project led by the National Solar Observatory to have dozens of citizen-scientists posted across the USA photograph the celestial event in an effort to create a live movie of its path that will help scientists learn more about the sun’s corona. Gillian Flaccus, AP Fullscreen An 8-foot balloon carrying a camera rises into the sky during a test launch at the University of Hartford in West Hartford, Conn.

, on Aug. 9, 2017. A team from the University of Bridgeport and the University of Hartford conducted the test as part a project that will send cameras into the stratosphere to photograph the solar eclipse. Pat Eaton-Robb, AP Fullscreen Like this topic? You may also like these photo galleries: Replay 1 of 150 2 of 150 3 of 150 4 of 150 5 of 150 6 of 150 7 of 150 8 of 150 9 of 150 10 of 150 11 of 150 12 of 150 13 of 150 14 of 150 15 of 150 16 of 150 17 of 150 18 of 150 19 of 150 20 of 150 21 of 150 22 of 150 23 of 150 24 of 150 25 of 150 26 of 150 27 of 150 28 of 150 29 of 150 30 of 150 31 of 150 32 of 150 33 of 150 34 of 150 35 of 150 36 of 150 37 of 150 38 of 150 39 of 150 40 of 150 41 of 150 42 of 150 43 of 150 44 of 150 45 of 150 46 of 150 47 of 150 48 of 150 49 of 150 50 of 150 51 of 150 52 of 150 53 of 150 54 of 150 55 of 150 56 of 150 57 of 150 58 of 150 59 of 150 60 of 150 61 of 150 62 of 150 63 of 150 64 of 150 65 of 150 66 of 150 67 of 150 68 of 150 69 of 150 70 of 150 71 of 150 72 of 150 73 of 150 74 of 150 75 of 150 76 of 150 77 of 150 78 of 150 79 of 150 80 of 150 81 of 150 82 of 150 83 of 150 84 of 150 85 of 150 86 of 150 87 of 150 88 of 150 89 of 150 90 of 150 91 of 150 92 of 150 93 of 150 94 of 150 95 of 150 96 of 150 97 of 150 98 of 150 99 of 150 100 of 150 101 of 150 102 of 150 103 of 150 104 of 150 105 of 150 106 of 150 107 of 150 108 of 150 109 of 150 110 of 150 111 of 150 112 of 150 113 of 150 114 of 150 115 of 150 116 of 150 117 of 150 118 of 150 119 of 150 120 of 150 121 of 150 122 of 150 123 of 150 124 of 150 125 of 150 126 of 150 127 of 150 128 of 150 129 of 150 130 of 150 131 of 150 132 of 150 133 of 150 134 of 150 135 of 150 136 of 150 137 of 150 138 of 150 139 of 150 140 of 150 141 of 150 142 of 150 143 of 150 144 of 150 145 of 150 146 of 150 147 of 150 148 of 150 149 of 150 150 of 150 Autoplay Show Thumbnails Show Captions Last Slide Next Slide.